Did a Woman Require Surgery After a Fidget Spinner Became Stuck in Her Vagina?

Two nearly-identical articles report the same false incident in two far-flung cities.

  • Published 14 June 2017

Claim

A woman was hospitalized after a fidget spinner became lodged in her vagina.

Rating

Origin

In mid-June 2017, identical articles reported that a faddish toy, the fidget spinner, had became lodged in a woman’s vagina:

A 24-year old woman from Edmonton in Canada’s Alberta Province has been rushed to hospital after a fidget spinner became stuck inside her vagina. Surgeons were forced to operate on the woman to remove the device, which had become stuck after she used it in an attempt to ‘pleasure herself’.

“We are confident the woman will make a full recovery, but for the moment she does face a fairly long recovery due to the internal damage the device made,” said one of the doctors who operated on the woman.


A 27-year old woman from Tulsa, Oklahoma has been rushed to hospital after a fidget spinner became stuck inside her vagina. Surgeons were forced to operate on the woman to remove the device, which had become stuck after she used it in an attempt to ‘pleasure herself’.

“We are confident the woman will make a full recovery, but for the moment she does face a fairly long recovery due to the internal damage the device made,” said one of the doctors who operated on the woman.

The articles are regional fake news items, adding to a long list of false tales of fidget spinner injuries. An immediate red flag is the identical verbiage in two separate locations (and countries), along with a lack of corroborating reports published by local media outlets.

Neither of the sites reporting the purported incidents are genuine news outlets. Additionally, the likelihood of the same “accident” occurring in two far-flung places (not to mind the word-for-word resemblance in the articles) is extraordinarily slim. 

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