CLAIM

Police officer Nakia Jones was fired after expressing her thoughts about police brutality in a viral Facebook live video. See Example( s )

EXAMPLES

FALSE

RATING

FALSE

ORIGIN

On 6 July 2016, police officer Nakia Jones published a candid video via Facebook Live, during which she discussed the Alton Sterling shooting controversy:

Jones’ video was viewed more than six million times in just two days, rapidly introducing her to a massive social media audience.

Not long after the video was shared widely, the web site Ask Kissy published a post that claimed Jones had been disciplined (or possibly fired) for airing her views on the social network. The site appeared to conclude from statements made by Jones at a press conference that she had been suspended or terminated from her position:

New York-area radio station WQHT further stirred the pot in a blog post suggestively titled “Did Officer Nakia Jones Get Fired For Speaking Against Police?! [PHOTO].” However, the tail end of that post said:

The mayor of Warrensville, Ohio, Brad Sellers shot down the rumors during a recent press conference.

Cleveland affiliate WOIO previously reported that Jones was neither fired nor suspended for her viral video, making their headline misleading:

Mayor Brad Sellers said Jones did not violate the social media policy that is currently in place. She is currently on full duty at the police department and there was not violations of any policies with the City of Warrensville Heights.

The city said it’s received threats to city hall by the KKK.

Media personality Roland Martin attempted to halt the spread of the rumor:

Despite rumors and concern, officer Nakia Jones remained on full duty and was not considered in violation of any policy.

Sources:

Ask Kissy.   “It’s No Surprise That Police Officer Nakia Jones Got Suspended For Speaking The Truth [VIDEO].”
    8 July 2016.

Hot 97.   “Did Officer Nakia Jones Get Fired For Speaking Against Police?! [PHOTO].”
    8 July 2016.

WOIO.   “Mayor: Warrensville Officer Did Not Violate Social Media Policy.”
    8 July 2016.