Fact Check

UPS Email Scam Promises 'Exclusive Reward'

Readers shouldn't waste their time on these kinds of survey scams.

Published Feb 4, 2022

GLENDALE, CA - JULY 22:  A United Parcel Service (UPS) driver walks back to his truck after making a delivery on July 22, 2010 in Glendale, California. UPS said its second quarter profit nearly doubled posting a net profit of $845 million, or 84 cents a share, compared to $445 million or 44 cents a year ago.  (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Image Via Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
Claim:
An email with a UPS logo and picture promise an exclusive reward for taking a 30-second survey.

In February 2022, we reviewed a survey scam email that was created to look like an official message from the United Parcel Service, better known as UPS. The email with a UPS logo and picture looked to be a "confirmation receipt" that promised an "exclusive reward" for taking a "30-second marketing survey."

However, again, this was a scam, and was not official correspondence from the company:

A UPS scam email promised an exclusive reward and included a supposed confirmation receipt however it all just led to surveys and fake offers.
The email included a countdown clock to make the fake offer seem urgent.

The scam email read as follows:

Confirmation Receipt

From: UPS <Support.B7SYN.B7VJB@odsafine.com>

UPS

Dear UPS Customer,

You have been selected to get an exclusive reward! To qualify, simply complete our 30-second marketing survey about your shopping experiences.

Click here to start!

10620 NW 123 Street Road Unit 102, Medley, Florida, 33178

The link in the email with the UPS picture and logo redirected to souldatabase.ru, which was a website hosted on a Russian domain:

A UPS scam email promised an exclusive reward and included a supposed confirmation receipt however it all just led to surveys and fake offers.
Courtesy: Scammers

The page (above) that resulted from the email that promised the "exclusive reward" from UPS read as follows:

Dear UPS User,

Congratulations!

Complete the short survey about UPS to select your exclusive offer of up to $100.00 cash value.

This special is available until February 4, 2022

After completing a 16-question survey, we were led to additional offers, meaning that the scam involved a seemingly endless road of surveys and false promises:

A UPS scam email promised an exclusive reward and included a supposed confirmation receipt however it all just led to surveys and fake offers.
We're going out on a limb and are guessing that this "2022 February Exclusive!" will be extended for every month for the foreseeable future.

In sum, such emails promising an "exclusive reward" from UPS were nothing more than scams that led to websites on .ru Russian domains. We recommend that readers avoid clicking any links in these kinds of emails as they could lead to phishing attempts and other dangerous outcomes.

We previously reported on a similar scam that had emails that were created to appear as if they came from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS).

Curious about how Snopes' writers verify information and craft their stories for public consumption? We've collected some posts that help explain how we do what we do. Happy reading and let us know what else you might be interested in knowing.

Jordan Liles is a Snopes reporter with expertise in investigating misinformation, inauthentic social media activity, and scams.

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