Did ‘Pioneer Woman’ Ree Drummond Experience ‘Allegations’ or Sad News and Endorse CBD and Keto Gummies?

Drummond, perhaps better known by her nickname, "The Pioneer Woman," was featured in Facebook ads that falsely claimed she had experienced sad news and that there were "allegations" against her.

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Ree Drummond aka The Pioneer Woman never endorsed Condor CBD Gummies or any other kind of CBD gummies product.
Image via Monica Schipper/Getty Images for The Pioneer Woman Magazine

Claim

Food blogger Ree Drummond, also known as “The Pioneer Woman,” experienced sad news or allegations against her and also endorsed CBD and keto gummies.

Rating

On June 28, 2022, we received reader mail informing us that scammers were using food blogger, author, and Food Network TV host Ree Drummond’s image and likeness to sell supposed weight loss products or “dementia solutions” called Condor CBD Gummies, Truly Keto, and TrimClinical Keto. Drummond, also known as “The Pioneer Woman,” was featured in several Facebook ads that claimed she had experienced a “tragic end,” a tragedy, sad news or unspecified “allegations.” These ads were nothing more than misleading clickbait and part of a scam. She never endorsed any CBD or keto gummies products or a “dementia solution.”

A reader who emailed us included a screenshot of one of the misleading ads. One of the ads read, “Her entire future is now in jeopardy! Fans feel sad about today’s news. A tragic end today for Ree Drummond.”

Ree Drummond aka The Pioneer Woman never endorsed Condor CBD Gummies or any other kind of CBD gummies product.
This ad was part of a false and misleading scam to sell CBD gummies.

Another reader sent in a different ad that read, “Fans are up in arms over the allegations pending against Ree Drummond. Here is all the information available to the public at this moment.”

Ree Drummond aka The Pioneer Woman never endorsed Condor CBD Gummies or any other kind of CBD gummies product.
In reality, there were no “allegations” against Drummond.

These false clickbait Facebook ads were familiar territory. We’ve reported before on misleading, scammy tactics just like these that were used in other CBD and keto gummies scams. In reality, there were no “allegations” against Drummond, nor was there any brand new sad or tragic news about her.

We received a screenshot of the article that showed a picture of Drummond and her name. The article was misleadingly designed to mimic the Fox News website. Fox News had nothing to do with the scam.

Ree Drummond aka The Pioneer Woman never endorsed Condor CBD Gummies or any other kind of CBD gummies product.
This article never appeared on FoxNews.com. The page was designed by scammers to mimic the official Fox News website.

The headline of the fake Fox News article read, “Ree Drummond reverses dementia solution, sparks huge lawsuit pressure on Fox, she finally fights back on air.” This was basically the same CBD gummies scam that previously featured “Jeopardy” host Mayim Bialik.

Meanwhile, a second article that was designed to look like the Time magazine website claimed, “Weight Loss Industry In Outrage Over Ree Drummond’s Keto Formula That’s Helping Millions Of Women & Even Men Melt Body Fat And Get Healthy Again In Memory Of Her Brother!” Just as with the fake Fox News article, this one also did not genuinely come from Time. We found these articles being hosted on j40ev2.com/h4Fhjee/, lirknluck.uk.com/tiram/index.html, and sgn394.com/7bn3lo9u/. The web domains may have been registered in China.

A third false article was created by scammers to mimic the “Today” TV show website and showed the headline, “Ree Drummond Forced To Lose 30 Pounds by ‘Food Network’ Producers… She Lost 50! (Her Diabetes Finally In Control).”

In our research, we located a number of scammy Facebook pages that mentioned Drummond’s name with the words CBD or keto gummies. According to when several of the pages were created or had their previous names changed, it looked like this scam began no earlier than mid-June 2022.

Ree Drummond aka The Pioneer Woman never endorsed Condor CBD Gummies or any other kind of CBD gummies product.
These six pages were just a sampling of the number of pages that had names about Drummond and CBD or keto gummies.

We reached out to Hearst Digital Media to inform them of the scam. The publisher hosts “The Pioneer Woman” blog. We also requested a statement, which we will add to this story if we receive a response.

In sum, there was no sad or tragic news or any “allegations” to report about Drummond, nor did “The Pioneer Woman” ever endorsed Condor CBD Gummies, Truly Keto, and TrimClinical Keto, or any other similar products for Fox News, Time, or “Today.”

Note: If readers spot any CBD or keto gummies scams for celebrities other than Ree Drummond, please contact us. It’s likely that scammers will switch to a different celebrity for the scam in future weeks. If possible, please include a direct link to the Facebook ad or to the page that’s hosting the ad. Unlike a screenshot, a link will allow us to fully look into the matter.

Sources:

“Ree Drummond.” Food Network, https://www.foodnetwork.com/profiles/talent/ree-drummond.

The Pioneer Woman. Hearst Digital Media, https://www.thepioneerwoman.com/.

Recent Updates
  1. On July 5, 2022, this article was updated with new details after a helpful reader located ads that falsely claimed Drummond had experienced "allegations" against her.
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