Was Mike Pence Kicked Out of Iceland?

You can't get kicked out of a place you haven't been.

  • Published 11 January 2019

Claim

Vice President Mike Pence was kicked out of Iceland due to his religious beliefs.

Rating

Origin

On 7 January 2019, an article posted on the “Laughing in Disbelief” blog reported that Vice President Mike Pence had been kicked out of Iceland due to a new law aimed at protecting the general population from religious fanatics:

Icelandic officials prevented Vice President Mike Pence from entering their country today. Law enforcement informed the Vice President and his team they were following the recent law protecting the populace from religious fanatics.

This was not a genuine news report, and the vice president was not given the boot from Iceland.

“Laughing in Disbelief” is a satirical blog published as part of the Patheos platform on religion and spirituality. The article was filed under a “Satire” tag, and readers who clicked on the link in the first sentence of the article were redirected to a page explaining that all content on “Laughing in Disbelief” is satire:

Have you clicked a link to a story and you’re here?

The story you are reading is satirical. The post may have links to real events that the satire is based on, but the Laughing in Disbelief article is fake.

In addition to the disclaimers, the authors of “Laughing in Disbelief” frequently drop hints intheir articles to alert readers about the satirical nature of the content. In this case, the author identified the president of Iceland as “Lars Bork” (but Guðni Th. Jóhannesson is the real president of Iceland).

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