Fact Check

Lowe's Email Scam Promises ‘Exclusive Reward’

Readers shouldn't waste their time on these kinds of survey scams.

Published Feb 7, 2022

FARMINGDALE, NEW YORK  - MARCH 16: An image of the sign for Lowe's as photographed on March 16,2020 in Farmingdale, New York . (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images) (Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
FARMINGDALE, NEW YORK - MARCH 16: An image of the sign for Lowe's as photographed on March 16,2020 in Farmingdale, New York . (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
Claim:
An email with a Lowe's logo promises an exclusive reward for taking a 30-second survey.

In February 2022, we reviewed a scam email that used the name of Lowe's home improvement company that promised an "exclusive reward" for taking a 30-second "satisfaction survey." It looked much like another email we looked at that used UPS as the company.

The message appeared like this:

Lowe's was not offering an exclusive reward for taking a 30-second survey because it was all a scam.
The scammers included a stock photograph of people who weren't even carrying Lowe's bags.

The email came from account.jnZnvVrqgG@hqflvrinqo.co.uk, which clearly was not a legitimate Lowe's email address. It read as follows:

Email address confirmation 4816

CustomerSurvey-Lowe’s account.jnZnvVrqgG@hqflvrinqo.co.uk

Free Exclusive Reward for Completing 30 Second Survey!

Lowe's Satisfaction Survey

Congratulations!

You have been selected to get an exclusive reward!

To qualify for this special offer, simply complete our 30-second marketing survey about your shopping experiences.

Click OK to start.

6130 W Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89103

This was not a genuine email from Lowe's. Real correspondence from Lowe's comes from email addresses ending in "@lowes.com," not "@hqflvrinqo.co.uk." Also, Lowe's would not use a stock photograph of two people walking through a shopping mall holding generic shopping bags.

The email appeared to be nothing more than foreign scammers trying to get people to waste their time on lengthy surveys that falsely promised big rewards. Such fake offers also perhaps led to phishing attempts or had other dangerous end results.

If any readers received an email with a Lowe's logo that promised an "exclusive reward" for taking a 30-second "satisfaction survey," we recommend deleting it.

Curious about how Snopes' writers verify information and craft their stories for public consumption? We've collected some posts that help explain how we do what we do. Happy reading and let us know what else you might be interested in knowing.

Jordan Liles is a Snopes reporter with expertise in investigating misinformation, inauthentic social media activity, and scams.

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