Did Kellogg’s Release Ranch-Flavored Pop-Tarts?

Pop-Tarts: "This is just disrespectful."

  • Published 25 June 2019

Claim

Kellogg's released a "Ranch Pop-Tart."

Rating

Origin

In June 2019, an image supposedly showing Kellogg’s newly released, ranch-flavored Pop-Tarts started circulating on social media:

This is not a genuine image of a real Kellogg’s product. This image was created by the Instagram account “Poptartaday,” a social media account that aims to posts a new fake flavor of Pop-Tarts every day. You can see a watermark for  @poptartaday in the upper left-hand corner of this image. 

Poptartaday posted this image to its Instagram account on 19 June 2019 with the caption: “Nothing hits the spot more than a warm late night Hidden Valley Ranch Pop Tart! Rich, creamy, and full of fresh seasoning @hidden.valley 🤤”

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Pop Tart A Day (@poptartaday) on

The @Poptartaday account has created dozens of other fake flavors of Pop-Tarts, such as feet, denim, squid ink, and garbage. The account notes that it is a “Parody Account” that is “not affiliated with the brands on my page.”

Kellogg’s has not released a ranch Pop-Tart. And, judging from a previous run-in with Pop-Tarts and ranch, it’s safe to say that they have no plans to do so in the future. In November 2017, a Twitter user posted a photograph of a Pop-Tart being dipped into some ranch dressing along with the caption: “You ain’t from Oklahoma if you don’t dip your Pop Tart in Ranch Dressing 🤷🏼‍♀️.”

The official Pop-Tarts Twitter account responded: “This is just disrespectful.”

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