‘Free Disney Theme Park Tickets’ Scam

Disney is not giving away free theme park tickets to those who like and share posts on Facebook; such offers are a form of sweepstakes scam.

  • Published 1 May 2012

Claim

Disney is giving away free theme park tickets to Facebook users.

Origin

For years now a scam purporting to offer free Disney theme park tickets to Facebook users who access a proffered link then enter their e-mail addresses and cell phone numbers has been spread by posts to social networking sites:

Those who attempt to claim the enticing freebies are typically led to a web page (not operated or sponsored by Disney) that asks them to provide personal information (including address and telephone number), answer a plethora of survey questions regarding various products and services, then agree to receive multiple sales calls via text messaging and telephone (even if they’re on the official “Do Not Call” list):

Such “free giveaways” are naught but cons (known as sweepstakes scams) meant to trick the credulous into divulging their personal information and signing up for expensive services. The Better Business Bureau provides this advice on avoiding being victimized by such scams:
  • If you receive a questionable or unsolicited text message, check the URL or phone number for free on the Better Business Bureau website.
  • Most financial institutions, utility, or other business will not communicate with you via text message. If you do not recognize the website or phone number being sent to you, don’t visit or call it.
  • Don’t e-mail or text personal and financial information.
  • Review your credit card and bank statements to make sure there are no unauthorized charges.
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