Angels Flying Over Brazil?

Rumor: A video clip captures two angels flying over Brazil.

Claim:   A video clip captures two angels flying over Brazil.


FALSE


Example:   [Collected via e-mail, April 2015]


There is a video circulating on the net showing 2 “angels” flying in the clouds over Brazil. It looks hokey but I need you folks to help me debunk this video. It’s on YouTube.

 

Origins:   This video clip purportedly showing two angels flying over Brazil racked up millions of views after it was uploaded to YouTube in 2014:



Several different backstories have been attached to this video, but the description included with the most popular copy of “Anjos Filmados No Céu” (Angels Filmed in the Sky) on YouTube claims that the footage was accidentally captured by a cameraman in Brazil:



A cameraman in in Boa Vista, Brazil caught in camera strange creature flying. The cameraman thought he was captured birds flying, but when zoomed the clip, he realized they were two strange winged creatures that resemble WHAT we may call angels. please watch and see for yourself.

But this is not the case. The original video was uploaded on 15 February 2014 by digital artist Jessen Carlos, and although he did not specifically state when he uploaded his original video that the angels had been digitally added, he did post a follow-up video in December 2014 showing how he had created the previous clip:



The YouTube video “Anjos Filmados No Céu” has fooled many viewers since it was uploaded to the Internet. The video, however, does not prove that angels exist, only that they can be created with CGI.

Last updated:   14 April 2015

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