Was Donald Trump Born in Pakistan?

A spoof conspiracy theory holds that Donald Trump was born in the country of Pakistan and not in the United States.

  • Published 14 November 2016

Claim

Donald Trump was born 'Dawood Ibrahim Khan' in Pakistan.

Rating

Origin

President-elect Donald Trump spent considerable time during President Obama’s tenure in office pushing the unfounded rumor that the commander-in-chief was not born in the United States:

Questions about Obama’s birthplace have long been settled. However, a new “birther” controversy arose during the 2016 presidential election, holding that Donald Trump was actually born in Pakistan under the name “Dawood Ibrahim Khan”:

The boy on the right-hand side of the above-displayed graphic is not Donald Trump. While we have yet to discover the exact origins of this photograph, this image has been circulating online since at least 2012, when it was posted to the Tumblr “Afghanistan in Photos,” where Pulitzer-winner Massoud Hossaini was credited as the photographer. The photograph wasn’t attached to Trump’s name until several years later. 

The accompanying story also makes little sense. According to this rumor, Trump didn’t arrive in the United States until after 1955, when he was a 9-year-old. Yet several photographs document Trump’s childhood with his family in New York:

Collage

Furthermore, Trump released his birth certificate in 2013 after a social media spat with comedian Bill Maher. Trump was born on 14 June 1946 in Queens, New York (not Pakistan), and he was named Donald John Trump (not Dawood Ibrahim Khan):

trump birth certificate
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