Does Nike Own Chevrolet?

People looking to boycott Nike-owned companies may want to avoid Converse and Hurley products, but no need to trade-in your Chevrolet vehicle.

  • Published 12 September 2018

Claim

The Nike sports apparel company owns the Chevrolet automobile brand.

Rating

Origin

In September 2018, many social media users joined in calling for a boycott against Nike after the sports apparel company featured controversial former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick in a new commercial. As images and videos purportedly showing these protesters burning Nike apparel started to circulate on the internet, a message suggesting that these individuals also get rid of their Chevrolet vehicles — because Nike ostensibly owned that automobile manufacturer — went viral on Facebook:

This simply isn’t true: Nike does not own Chevrolet.

Nike is one of the largest apparel businesses in the world, and over the years they have acquired a number of related companies, such as Converse and Hurley. However, Nike does not own any car companies, let alone Chevrolet. Chevrolet has been a division of the American automobile manufacturer General Motors for about a century now.

The claim that Nike owns Chevrolet was made up out of whole cloth in order to “troll” the individuals who were boycotting Nike over their sponsorship deal with Colin Kaepernick. A similar jape was circulated around the same time which claimed that Ford USA had “followed Nike’s lead” and hired Kaepernick to star in their new ad campaign, but that rumor was also merely a joke aimed at mocking contemporary protests against Nike.

Snopes.com
Since 1994
A Word to Our Loyal Readers

Support Snopes and make a difference for readers everywhere.

Editorial
  • David Mikkelson
  • Doreen Marchionni
  • David Emery
  • Bond Huberman
  • Jordan Liles
  • Alex Kasprak
  • Dan Evon
  • Dan MacGuill
  • Bethania Palma
  • Liz Donaldson
Operations
  • Vinny Green
  • Ryan Miller
  • Chris Reilly
  • Chad Ort
  • Elyssa Young

Most Snopes assignments begin when readers ask us, “Is this true?” Those tips launch our fact-checkers on sprints across a vast range of political, scientific, legal, historical, and visual information. We investigate as thoroughly and quickly as possible and relay what we learn. Then another question arrives, and the race starts again.

We do this work every day at no cost to you, but it is far from free to produce, and we cannot afford to slow down. To ensure Snopes endures — and grows to serve more readers — we need a different kind of tip: We need your financial support.

Support Snopes so we continue to pursue the facts — for you and anyone searching for answers.

Team Snopes