Alpha ZXT Not Endorsed By Denzel Washington, Jamie Foxx, Tiger Woods

Contrary to promotional claims, a new “miracle” brain pill called Alpha ZXT has not been endorsed by a wide range of celebrities including Denzel Washington, Jamie Foxx, and Tiger Woods.

While we won’t address the scientific merits of this “brain pill,” we can say that these celebrity endorsements are complete fabrications.

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Have you ever wondered how Tiger Woods became the world’s #1 golfer? Or how Denzel Washington and Jamie Foxx won Academy Awards? Well, it has nothing to do with a little clear pill called Alpha ZXT.

Rumors about a new “breakthrough brain health supplement” endorsed by a wide range of celebrities started circulating online at the beginning of 2015. While it’s unclear where these rumors started (there’s no mention of these endorsements on the web site AlphaZXT.com), one iteration of them was published by the blog Kampus Smakk on 22 February 2015:

“Jamie Foxx has long been known as one of the smartest and highest achieving actors in the world. He is credited for his abilities to continue to enhance his mental capabilties. He reads a script once, and can recite any line from any movie in the past 10 years. That’s why we were shocked to hear that he admitted that he takes a brain booster which doubled his IQ, skyrocketed his energy levels and gets him ‘in the zone’ within minutes called Alpha ZXT . He credits his 140 million dollar net worth solely to this ‘clear pill’ so we had to ask … Is it safe?”

While Kampus Smakk claimed that the above-quoted passage was originally published in an article by James Rickman at Discovery Magazine, a search of their web site showed no results for the phrases Alpha ZXT or James Rickman. Furthermore, several passages from the Kampus Smakk article were taken verbatim from previous articles published about another “ground breaking” brain pill, Evo, in 2014.

Here’s one example. The following paragraph was published on Kampus Smakk on 22 February 2015:

Alpha ZXT soon became known as the ‘most powerful self-development trick on earth’. Not long after, everyone from quiz show contestants to university students were taking the pill to double their IQ, triple their salary and achieve peak performance in little time. Alpha ZXT, which has no recorded side effects in any trials, was soon the target of several major pharmaceutical companies who claimed it gave people an unfair advantage over anyone who was unaware of its existence. The pill was eventually banned on shows like Jeopardy! and at top universities such as Cambridge before production of the limitless pills were halted.

This same paragraph was published on Brain Science Today (again supposedly authored by “James Rickman”) on 24 September 2014, only with “Evo” in place of the phrase “Alpha ZXT”:

Evo soon became known as the ‘most powerful self-development trick on earth’. Not long after, everyone from quiz show contestants to university students were taking the pill to double their IQ, triple their salary and achieve peak performance in little time. Evo, which has no recorded side effects in any trials, was soon the target of several major pharmaceutical companies who claimed it gave people an unfair advantage over anyone who was unaware of its existence. The pill was eventually banned on shows like Jeopardy! and at top universities such as Cambridge before production of the Limitless pills were halted.

In addition to false stories claiming that celebrities such as Denzel Washington and Jamie Foxx have endorsed Alpha ZXT, fabricated photographs also tie athletes such as Tiger Woods to the purported miracle pill:

This is not a real Time magazine cover; it’s an altered version of one published in 2005:

Suffice it to say that in addition to the non-endorsements of this “miracle pill” by Tiger Woods, Bill Gates, Jamie Foxx, and Denzel Washington, neither Jeopardy! nor Cambridge university has announced any ban of it (or a similar subsance).