Scientists Use Tiny Trackers, Plane to Follow Moths on Move

Trillions of insects migrate across the globe each year, yet little is known about their journeys.

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In this undated image provided by the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, after tagging, moths are released in Konstanz, Germany, and followed in a light aircraft for up to 80 kilometers into the Alps. Scientists in Germany attached tiny trackers to giant moths looking for clues about insect migration. (Christian Ziegler/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior via AP)
Image via AP Photo/Christian Ziegler

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

NEW YORK (AP) — Trillions of insects migrate across the globe each year, yet little is known about their journeys. So to look for clues, scientists in Germany took to the skies, placing tiny trackers on the backs of giant moths and following them by plane. To the researchers’ surprise, the moths seemed to have a strong sense of where they were going. Even when the winds changed, the insects stayed on a straight course,…

Read at AP News