Despite Push, States Slow to Make Juneteenth a Paid Holiday

After an initial burst of action, the movement to have it recognized as an official holiday in the states has largely stalled.

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FILE - People attend Juneteenth celebrations in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, on June 19, 2021. Recognition of Juneteenth, the effective end of slavery in the U.S., gained traction after the police killing of George Floyd in 2020. But after an initial burst of action, the movement to have it recognized as an official holiday in the states has largely stalled. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez, File)
Image via AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Recognition of Juneteenth, the effective end of slavery in the U.S., gained traction after the police killing of George Floyd in 2020. But after an initial burst of action, the movement to have it recognized as an official holiday in the states has largely stalled. Although almost every state recognizes Juneteenth in some fashion, many have been slow to do more than issue a proclamation or resolution, even as some continue…

Read at AP News