329 Years Later, Last Salem ‘Witch’ Who Wasn’t is Pardoned

It took more than three centuries, but the last Salem “witch” who wasn’t has been officially pardoned.

  • Published
FILE - Karla Hailer, a fifth-grade teacher from Scituate, Mass., takes a video on July 19, 2017, where a memorial stands at the site in Salem, Mass., where five women were hanged as witches more than three centuries years earlier. Massachusetts lawmakers on Thursday, May 26, 2022, formally exonerated Elizabeth Johnson Jr., clearing her name 329 years after she was convicted of witchcraft in 1693 at the height of the Salem Witch Trials. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)
Image via AP Photo/Stephan Savoia

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

BOSTON (AP) — It took more than three centuries, but the last Salem “witch” who wasn’t has been officially pardoned. Massachusetts lawmakers on Thursday formally exonerated Elizabeth Johnson Jr., clearing her name 329 years after she was convicted of witchcraft in 1693 and sentenced to death at the height of the Salem Witch Trials. Johnson was never executed, but neither was she officially pardoned like others wrongly accused of witchcraft. Lawmakers agreed to reconsider her…

Read at AP News