Alabama Shipwreck Holds Key for Kin of Enslaved Africans

Keys to the past and the future of a community descended from enslaved Africans lie in a river bottom on Alabama's Gulf Coast.

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Members of the team assessing the sunken wreckage of the last U.S. slave ship, the Clotilda, are shown looking at timbers from the schooner near Mobile, Ala., on Wednesday, May 4, 2022. The ship was scuttled after arriving on the Gulf Coast more than 160 years ago. (AP Photo/Daniel Fiore, Alabama Historical Commission)
Image via AP Photo/Daniel Fiore

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Keys to the past and the future of a community descended from enslaved Africans lie in a river bottom on Alabama’s Gulf Coast, where the remains of the last known U.S. slave ship rest a few miles from what’s left of the village built by the newly freed people after the Civil War. Work performed this month will help answer a question residents of the area called Africatown USA are anxious…

Read at AP News