Homer Plessy, Key to ‘Separate but Equal,’ on Road to Pardon

A Louisiana board voted to pardon Homer Plessy, whose decision to sit in a “whites-only" railroad car led to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1896 “separate but equal” ruling affirming state segregation laws.

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FILE - This June 3, 2018 photo shows a marker on the burial site for Homer Plessy at St. Louis No. 1 Cemetery in New Orleans. Homer Plessy, the namesake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1896 “separate but equal” ruling, is being considered for a posthumous pardon. The Creole man of color died with a conviction still on his record for refusing to leave a whites-only train car in New Orleans in 1892. (AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz, File)
Image via AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Louisiana board on Friday voted to pardon Homer Plessy, whose decision to sit in a “whites-only” railroad car to protest discrimination led to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1896 “separate but equal” ruling affirming state segregation laws. The state Board of Pardons’ unanimous decision to clear the Creole man’s record of a conviction now goes to Gov. John Bel Edwards, who has final say over the pardon. He was out of…

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