Japan’s Princess Mako Marries Commoner, Loses Royal Status

The marriage to Kei Komuro cost Mako her royal status.

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Japan's former Princess Mako, right, the elder daughter of Crown Prince Akishino and Crown Princess Kiko, and her husband Kei Komuro, look at each other during a press conference to announce their marriage at a hotel in Tokyo, Japan Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021. Former Princess Mako married the commoner and lost her royal status Tuesday in a union that has split public opinion after a three-year delay caused by a financial dispute involving her new mother-in-law. (Nicolas Datiche/Pool Photo via AP)
Image via AP Photo/Nicolas Datiche

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese Princess Mako quietly married a commoner without traditional wedding celebrations Tuesday and said their marriage — delayed three years and opposed by some — “was a necessary choice to live while cherishing our hearts.” The marriage to Kei Komuro cost Mako her royal status. She received her husband’s surname — the first time she has had a family name. Most Japanese women must abandon their own family names upon marriage due…

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