Young Sikhs Still Struggle with Post-Sept. 11 Discrimination

Sikh entrepreneur Balbir Singh Sodhi was killed at his Arizona gas station four days after the Sept. 11 attacks by a man who declared he was “going to go out and shoot some towel-heads” and mistook him for an Arab Muslim.

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Rose Kaur Sodhi, a medical resident at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, stands for a portrait Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2021, in Los Angeles. Rose, Balbir Singh Sodhi’s niece, was a second grader getting ready for a relative’s birthday party when her family learned of her uncle’s murder. “We knew something was terribly wrong because my dad came home crying. I had never seen that before,” she said of her father and Balbir’s brother, Rana Singh Sodhi, who became a well-known figure in the Sikh American community and taught her to share her family’s story and advocate for peace. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Image via AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

MESA, Ariz. (AP) — Sikh entrepreneur Balbir Singh Sodhi was killed at his Arizona gas station four days after the Sept. 11 attacks by a man who declared he was “going to go out and shoot some towel-heads” and mistook him for an Arab Muslim. Young Sikh Americans still struggle a generation later with the discrimination that 9/11 unleashed against their elders and them, ranging from school bullying to racial profiling to hate crimes —…

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