Black Female WWII Unit Hoping to Get Congressional Honor

Maj. Fannie Griffin McClendon and her Army colleagues never dwelled on being the only Black battalion of women to serve in Europe during World War II.

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In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Women's Museum, members of the 6888th battalion stand in formation in Birmingham, England, in 1945. The Women's Army Corps battalion, which made history as the only all-female Black unit to serve in Europe during World War II, is set to be honored by Congress. (U.S. Army Women's Museum via AP)
Image via AP Photo/Uncredited

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

BOSTON (AP) — Maj. Fannie Griffin McClendon and her Army colleagues never dwelled on being the only Black battalion of women to serve in Europe during World War II. They had a job to do. The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was credited with solving a growing mail crisis during its stint in England and, upon their return, serving as a role model to generations of Black women who joined the military. But for decades,…

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