Diana Legacy Lingers As Fans Mark Late Royal’s 60th Birthday

Those touched by the life of the preschool teacher turned princess remembered her ahead of what would have been her 60th birthday, recalling the complicated royal rebel who left an enduring imprint on the House of Windsor.

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CORRECTING YEAR TO 1997 - FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 16, 1997 file photo, Britain's Princess Diana faces photographers as she leaves Luanda airport building to board a plane to Johannesburg at the end of her four-day visit to Angola. For someone who began her life in the spotlight as “Shy Di,” Princess Diana became an unlikely, revolutionary during her years in the House of Windsor. She helped modernize the monarchy by making it more personal, changing the way the royal family related to people. By interacting more intimately with the public -- kneeling to the level of children, sitting on edge of a patient’s hospital bed, writing personal notes to her fans -- she set an example that has been followed by other royals as the monarchy worked to become more human and remain relevant in the 21st century. (AP Photo/Giovanni Deffidenti, File)
Image via AP Photo/Giovanni Difideni

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LONDON (AP) — Most people wouldn’t volunteer to walk through a minefield. Princess Diana did it twice. On Jan. 15, 1997, Diana walked gingerly down a narrow path cleared through an Angolan minefield, wearing a protective visor and flak jacket emblazoned with the name of The HALO Trust, a group devoted to removing mines from former war zones. When she realized some of the photographers accompanying her didn’t get the shot, she turned around and…

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