Mine-Sniffing Rat Magawa Ends Years of Hard Work in Cambodia

“Although still in good health, he has reached a retirement age and is clearly starting to slow down,” APOPO said. “It is time.”

  • Published
This undated file photo provided by the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) shows Cambodian landmine detection rat, Magawa, wearing his PDSA Gold Medal, the animal equivalent of the George Cross, in Siem, Cambodia. After five years of sniffing out land mines and unexploded ordnance in Cambodia, Magawa is retiring. The African giant pouched rat has been the most successful rodent trained and overseen by a Belgian nonprofit, APOPO, to find land mines and alert its human handlers so the explosives can be safely removed. (PDSA via AP, File)
Image via AP Photo/Uncredited

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — After five years of sniffing out land mines and unexploded ordnance in Cambodia, Magawa is retiring. The African giant pouched rat has been the most successful rodent trained and overseen by a Belgian nonprofit, APOPO, to find land mines and alert his human handlers so the explosives can be safely removed. Last year, Magawa won a British charity’s top civilian award for animal bravery — an honor so far exclusively…

Read at AP News