Prototype of First US Dollar Coins Going Up for Auction

A piece of copper that was struck by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia in 1794 and was a prototype for the fledgling nation’s money will go up for auction.

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This undated photo provided by Heritage Auctions shows the front of a piece of copper that was struck by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia in 1794 and was a prototype for the fledgling nation's money. The item, which is known as the “No Stars Flowing Hair Dollar," is owned by businessman and Texas Rangers co-chairman Bob Simpson and will go up for auction at Heritage Auctions in Dallas on Friday, April 23, 2021. (Emily Clements/Heritage Auctions via AP)
Image via AP Photo/Emily Clements

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

A piece of copper that was struck by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia in 1794 and was a prototype for the fledgling nation’s money will go up for auction Friday. Businessman and Texas Rangers co-chairman Bob Simpson owns the item, which is known as the “No Stars Flowing Hair Dollar.” While it closely resembles silver dollars that were later minted in Philadelphia, it gets its name because it is missing stars. “While subsequent dollar coins…

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