Debunked COVID-19 Myths Survive Online, Despite Facts

Public health officials, fact checkers and doctors tried to quash hundreds of COVID-19 rumors in myriad ways.

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FILE - In this Nov. 21, 2020, file photo, a pedestrian walks past a mural reading: "When out of your home, Wear a mask over your mouth and nose," during the coronavirus outbreak in San Francisco. From speculation that the coronavirus was created in a lab to a number of hoax cures, an overwhelming amount of false information about COVID-19 has followed the virus as it circled the globe over the past year. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
Image via AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

This article was republished here with permission from The Associated Press, however it is no longer available to read on Snopes.com.

CHICAGO (AP) — Public health officials, fact checkers and doctors tried to quash hundreds of rumors in myriad ways. But misinformation around the pandemic has endured as vexingly as the virus itself. And with the U.S., U.K. and Canada rolling out vaccinations this month, many falsehoods are seeing a resurgence online. A look at five stubborn myths around COVID-19 that were shared this year and continue to travel: MYTH: MASKS DON’T OFFER PROTECTION FROM THE…

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