CLAIM

A California Senate bill gives the state the right to seize children from their families See Example(s)

EXAMPLES
Collected via e-mail, December 2016

Proposed on the senate floor on December 5th 2016, SB -18 the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth in California, would give the state of California the right to take away your child if ‘they’ deem necessary.

Dr. Richard Pan, the pediatrician behind SB277, the CA bill that removed vaccination exemptions from thousands of California families is at it again. Apparently he feels that if his agenda is not met, then the state has a better chance of raising your child then you do!

Here is the overview of the proposed bill…. But please read carefully as this bill has very loosely defined terms as to what is a “right” and what could easily be manipulated to make a case for confiscating your child!

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST

SB 18, as introduced, Pan. Bill of Rights for Children and Youth in California.
Existing law provides for the care and welfare of children and youth in various contexts, including, but not limited to, child welfare services, foster care, health care, nutrition, homeless assistance, and education.
Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 80 (Res. Ch. 101, Stats. 2009) declares the Legislature’s support of a Bill of Rights for the Children and Youth of California that resolves to invest in all children and youth in order to achieve specified goals to create an optimal environment for their healthy development.
This bill would declare the intent of the Legislature to expand and codify the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California to establish a comprehensive framework that governs the rights of all children and youth in California, outlines the research-based essential needs of California’s children, and establishes standards relating to the health, safety, well-being, early childhood and educational opportunities, and familial supports necessary for all children to succeed.
The bill would declare the intent of the Legislature, by January 1, 2022, to enact legislation for the purpose of ensuring that the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California, in its totality, is applied evenly, equitably, and appropriately to all children and youth across the state.

BILL TEXT

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

(a) The Legislature finds and declares that all children and youth, regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity, national origin, culture, religion, immigration status, sexual orientation, or ability, have inherent rights that entitle them to protection, special care, and assistance, including, but not limited to, the following:

(1) The right to parents, guardians, or caregivers who act in their best interest.
(2) The right to form healthy attachments with adults responsible for their care and well-being.
(3) The right to live in a safe and healthy environment.
(4) The right to social and emotional well-being.
(5) The right to opportunities to attain optimal cognitive, physical, and social development.
(6) The right to appropriate, quality education and life skills leading to self-sufficiency in adulthood.
(7) The right to appropriate, quality health care.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this act to expand and codify the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California created by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 80 (Res. Ch. 101, Stats. 2009), to establish a comprehensive framework that governs the rights of all children and youth in California, outlines the research-based essential needs of California’s children, and establishes standards relating to the health, safety, well-being, early childhood and educational opportunities, and familial supports necessary for all children to succeed.

SEC. 2.

It is the intent of the Legislature, by January 1, 2022, to enact appropriate legislation to accomplish all of the following:

(a) Develop and put forth research-based policy solutions that will ensure the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California, in its totality, is applied evenly, equitably, and appropriately to all children and youth across the state.
(b) Determine the amount of revenue and resources necessary to ensure that the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California, in its totality, is applied evenly, equitably, and appropriately to all children and youth across the state.
(c) Identify and obtain the revenue and resources necessary to ensure that the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California, in its totality, is applied evenly, equitably, and appropriately to all children and youth across the state.

Many across the state are already calling this the “The Destruction of Family Act, or The Medical Kidnap Act, or The Government Owns Your Children Act.”
The website, Age of Autism, asks, “Why would a state, in the United States of America, have to enact legislation to ensure what the Constitution already protects – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?”
Read this closely again. Who decides what “acting in a child’s best interest” means? Or what is “appropriate” healthcare?
This is very frightening and downright scary news to any parent in the state of California. Imagine for a minute that someone shows up at your door and physically takes your children out of your home? And for what reason? They didn’t go to the dentist? They didn’t get their latest flu shot? Perhaps you homeschool your child and the state doesn’t think you are doing a good job.
Many parents across social media are already calling this the ‘most destructive’ family based bill to ever hit the floor of the California senate. Some parents are even calling for immediate removal of Senator Pan from his senate seat.
One parent comments, “The lines of the California state senate and the endorsement deals that Senator Pan has made with various pharmaceutical companies are completely blurred. “

One could say that this senator has been ‘bought’ and is nothing more than a ‘whipping boy’ for whatever drug company that decides to write him a check to endorse their latest products.”

Unfortunately, this may actually be the truth. According to Health Impact News,
“Pharmaceutical companies and their trade groups gave more than $2 million to current members of the Legislature in 2013-2014, about 2 percent of the total raised, records show. Nine of the top 20 recipients are either legislative leaders or serve on either the Assembly or Senate health committees. Receiving more than $95,000, the top recipient of industry campaign cash is Sen. Richard Pan, a Sacramento Democrat and doctor who is carrying the vaccine bill.

In addition, the industry donated more than $500,000 to outside campaign spending groups that helped elect some current members last year.

Pharmaceutical companies also spent nearly $3 million more during the 2013-2014 legislative session lobbying the Legislature, the governor, the state pharmacists’ board and other agencies, according to state filings. (Source.)”

What do you think about this? Are you concerned that if this bill should pass that you would lose your rights to your child? That this bill would in essence be an infringement on your rights as a parent to your child?

Answer in the comments below

false

RATING

false

ORIGIN

An “alternative health” website published a story on 9 December 2016, accusing a California lawmaker of facilitating government seizure of children through a new state Senate bill. The piece claims that state Sen. Richard Pan (D) placed families in danger when he introduced state Senate Bill 18 on 5 December 2016:

This bill would declare the intent of the Legislature to expand and codify the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California to establish a comprehensive framework that governs the rights of all children and youth in California, outlines the research-based essential needs of California’s children, and establishes standards relating to the health, safety, well-being, early childhood and educational opportunities, and familial supports necessary for all children to succeed. The bill would declare the intent of the Legislature, by January 1, 2022, to enact legislation for the purpose of ensuring that the Bill of Rights for Children and Youth of California, in its totality, is applied evenly, equitably, and appropriately to all children and youth across the state.

While the story ran the proposal verbatim, it did not identify any specific language in the bill authorizing officials to remove children from their households. Instead it claimed — without sources — that “many across the state” are already ripping the bill. (It also heavily suggested that Pan was a “whipping boy” for the pharmaceutical industry.)

The lawmaker, a pediatrician and faculty member at the University of California-Davis, has been targeted by opponents of mandatory school vaccination programs since co-authoring a different measure, Senate Bill 277, in February 2015.

As his spokesperson, Shannan Martinez, said in a statement:

This is a personal vendetta they have against Dr. Pan.

They don’t want to understand the bill and instead choose to make up lies about the legislation and the Senator.

The irony is that they oppose an effort to empower parents and ensure children and families get the support they need to succeed.

The vaccination bill, which was filed in response to a measles outbreak at Disneyland in 2014, eliminated “personal belief” exemptions for public and private school students across the state. It was enacted on 30 June 2015, meaning that students would be required to be vaccinated unless they were granted a medical exemption.

Pan reported getting threats via email and by phone after the bill was signed, enough so that he required additional security. A recall petition against him needing 35,926 signatures later failed after not getting a single signature.

Sources:

Gutierrez, Melody. “Death threats made to office of state vaccine bill author.” San Francisco Chronicle. 17 April 2015.

White, Jeremy B. “Richard Pan recall effort falls short on vaccine issue.” Sacramento Bee. 4 January 2016.

California legislative information. “SB-18 Bill of Rights for Children and Youth in California.” http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov. 5 December 2016.